JavaScript FAQ's

1. What is JavaScript?
2. Do I have to buy JavaScript? 
3. What is JScript?
4
. Are JavaScript and JScript the same?
5
. What is ECMA Script?
6
. Who 'owns' JavaScript?
7
. Will you be writing a book on JavaScript?
8. Do you offer any classes on JavaScript?
9. Will a knowledge of JavaScript get me a good job?
10.Does JavaScript have constants?


1. What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is an Object-oriented programming language. It is sometimes called a scripting language. JavaScript is not compiled--but is interpreted by Internet Browsers (such as Internet Explorer, Netscape, Mozilla, FireFox, Opera) when either embedded in an HTML page or added as a reference.

In terms of functionality, JavaScript is a very powerful language.

By the way, JavaScript is NOT Java. Java was developed by Sun Microsystems---the original version of JavaScript was developed by the Netscape organization.


2. Do I have to buy JavaScript?

No--there is nothing to buy.

The JavaScript interpreter is included in all major Internet Browsers--so as long as you have an Internet Browser, you're all set. 

JavaScript source files are written using an ordinary text editor, such as Notepad.


3. What is JScript?

JScript is Microsoft's version of Netscape's JavaScript.

Each Internet Browser vendor creates their own version of what is collectively known as JavaScript---however, the latest versions of these browsers are moving towards the ECMA Script standard. 

Read more about ECMAScript below.


4. Are JavaScript and JScript the same?

That depends. 

JavaScript is Netscape's version of 'JavaScript'. JScript is Microsoft's version of 'JavaScript'.

With a 3% marketshare for Netscape's Internet Browser and a 90% marketshare for Microsoft's Internet Explorer, which one is really 'JavaScript'?

Read more about ECMAScript below.


5. What is ECMAScript?

Recognizing the confusion of having multiple flavors of Javascript (one for each vendor's Internet Browser), shortly after the introduction of JavaScript by Netscape in Netscape 2.0, the major Internet Vendors agreed to turn JavaScript over to ECMA (in 1996). 

Ecma International is an industry association founded in 1961 and dedicated to the standardization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Consumer Electronics (CE). 

ECMAScript is really JavaScript--hardly anyone knows it as ECMAScript.

You can count on major Internet Vendors to adhere to the standards of ECMAScript when implementing their own version ---although you may find Internet Vendors who add additional capabilities to their own versions.

You can read more about ECMAScript here.

http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-262.htm


6. Who 'owns' JavaScript?

ECMA governs the standard features of JavaScript---however, each vendor writes the code for their own versions of JavaScript.


7. Will you be writing a book on JavaScript?

Yes I have---you can find more information about it here.


8. Do you offer any classes on JavaScript?

Yes, I offer an Introductory course on JavaScript. You can find more information about it, and my other Internet based course, here...

http://www.johnsmiley.com/main/training.htm


9. Will a knowledge of JavaScript get me a good job?

JavaScript is a language that used quite often in Web Development. Because Web Development is such a hot technology, it makes sense that a knowledge and proficiency in JavaScript will go a long way towards getting you a good job.


10. Does JavaScript have constants?

If you mean constants (the opposite of a variable), no---JavaScript does not yet support constants, although  the word 'const' is a reserved work for future use in the ECMAScript standard.

From the discussion above pertaining to Internet Vendors, it is possible that you will find an Internet Browser that supports constants---but it's not yet in the ECMAScript standard.

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